Professor Diego Sánchez-Ancochea

Professor Diego Sanchez-Ancochea

Job Title:  Advisor
Email: diego.sanchez-ancochea@qeh.ox.ac.uk
Social Media: @dsanco 

Biography

Diego is an Advisor at OPHI, and the Head of Department of the Oxford Department for International Development at the University of Oxford. He has published extensively on topics relating to political economy and inequality, particularly in Latin America, in international journals such as World Development, the Journal of Latin American Studies, Latin American Politics and Society and Latin American Research Review. He is also the co-editor of four books and the co-author of two books with Juliana Martínez Franzoni: Good Jobs and Social Services: How Costa Rica Achieved the Elusive Double Incorporation (Palgrave Macmillan) and The Quest for Universal Social Policy in the South: Actors, Ideas and Architectures (Cambridge University Press). This recent book explores the determinants of universal social policy in the South – the topic he continues to work on at the moment.

He previously taught at the Institute for the Study of the Americas (University of London) between 2003 and 2008. Diego has been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Costa Rica, at FLACSO-Dominican Republic and the programme Desigualdades (Berlin). He was a Visiting Fellow at the Kellogg Institute in the University of Notre Dame during 2018/19 where he worked on The Costs of Inequality. He collaborates frequently with the ILO, UNDP, ECLAC, Oxford Analytica and other organisations.

He is co-editor of the Journal of Latin American Studies and member of the editorial boards of Oxford Development Studies andJournal of Development Studies. He is also treasurer of the Latin American Studies Association and was director of the Latin American Center at the University of Oxford between 2015 and 2018.

Education

PhD in Economics, New School for Social Research (New York) 

Research Interests 

Political economy of Latin America with a particular focus on Central America; determinants of income inequality and the role of social policy in reducing it.