How Many Children Live in Poverty? An Estimation of Global Child Multidimensional Poverty

Forthcoming paper, not yet published

The main purpose of this paper is to estimate child multidimensional poverty in developing countries. In this paper a child is defined as poor if she lives in a multidimensionally poor household according to the Global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI). Based on Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s (OPHI) Global MPI figures and using as reference 2010 population estimates, we estimate the incidence and intensity of child poverty in developing countries and by world regions. We also present these estimates for the different children age sub-groups (0-4, 5-9, 10-14 and 15-17) and compare them with the incidence and intensity of poverty among adults. Finally, we break down the world and regional child multidimensional poverty estimates by indicator. We find that more than one third of children living in developing countries are multidimensionally poor; that children are more afflicted by poverty, both in terms of incidence and intensity, than adults; that South Asia houses close to half of the poor children and Sub-Saharan Africa houses one third; and that in rural areas, over 1 in every 2 children is multidimensionally poor on average, while in urban areas it is 1 in every 6 children.

Citation: Vaz, A. (xxxx). “How Many Children Live in Poverty? An Estimation of Global Child Multidimensional Poverty.” OPHI Research in Progress 45a, University of Oxford.

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